Independence Day is here, and with it comes tons of great food, good company, and a sky filled with lights to celebrate America’s separation from British rule. The 4th of July is one of America’s most widely celebrated holidays, topped only by Halloween, Thanksgiving, and Christmas. With millions of Americans flocking to beaches, parks, and backyards around the country to enjoy the fun and festivities, it can be easy to forget the dangers associated with this holiday. Fireworks cause an average of 18,500 fires a year, leading to injuries, casualties, and millions of dollars in property damage. Lieberman Injury Law wants you to enjoy the holiday without becoming part of that statistic. Keep yourself and your family safe this 4th of July by following these four simple tips.

DO NOT DRINK AND DRIVE

Drinking and driving is never a good idea, but doing so around the holidays increases your risk of being involved in an accident. If you plan on enjoying a few drinks with friends or family, be sure to have a designated driver or make plans to take an Uber. Yes, even if time has passed since your last drink. Alcohol can impair your judgement and reaction time even hours after your last drink. The risk is never worth it.

If you find yourself the victim of a drunk driver this 4th of July, a car accident lawyer in South Florida can help you get the compensation you deserve for your damages. These funds can help you repair or replace your vehicle, cover medical bills, or make up for lost wages due to your injuries. If you lost a loved one as the tragic result of a drunk driving accident, pursuing a claim through a wrongful death lawyer in South Florida can help to ease the financial strain. Call Lieberman Injury Law today for more information about how we can help.

 Be Careful with Fireworks

Did you know that most fireworks are actually illegal in Florida? Fireworks that become airborne and explode in the sky are not allowed for at-home use, yet most people don’t know that their 4th of July celebration may be breaking the law. While law enforcement is typically lenient when it comes to Independence Day, in some cities you may be ticketed for setting off fireworks in your neighborhood.

Instead of doing your own firework display, consider heading to your nearest beach or park that is hosting a professional 4th of July fireworks event. Not only are these fireworks a higher grade and more impressive, you don’t have to worry about accidently setting your home or your neighbor’s car ablaze.

If you choose to add to the nationwide fireworks display, please exercise caution. Don’t try to launch projectiles from your hands or aim them at others. Be sure small children and pets are kept a safe distance from dangerous fireworks and supervised throughout the display. Having easy access to a fire extinguisher or water supply can help minimize damage in case of an accident.

BBQ Safety

Fireworks aren’t the only custom associated with the 4th of July. Barbecuing or grilling in your backyard or at a local park is a great way to bring family and friends together to celebrate. Just be sure to practice basic barbeque safety:

  • Don’t pour fuel directly onto an open flame
  • Be sure the fire is completely extinguished before disposing of wood or coal
  • Never leave an active fire unattended
  • Don’t allow children under the age of 18 to tend to the grill
  • Use tongs, spatulas, and other cooking utensils to manipulate food
  • Keep a fire extinguisher accessible at all times

DO NOT FIRE GUNS

Some gun owners pull out their weapons to join in the Independence Day celebrations by firing a few rounds into the sky. This is a terrible idea that can easily end in tragedy. Gravity dictates that what goes up must come down, and that includes those bullets. Don’t risk striking yourself, a loved one, or possible an innocent bystander the next block over. Even if you’re only firing shots as part of your 4th of July celebration will not absolve you of responsibility for any resulting consequences.

Be safe and enjoy your Independence Day festivities!

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